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Dinosaur of the Day #147 - Elasmotherium

#1

Lythronax

Elasmotherium is a giant rhinoceros which lived approximately 2 million all the way to 10,000 years ago – from the Pleistocene, all the way through the Modern Period. It was first discovered during the early 18th century in Russia and was subsequently described and named by Johann Fischer von Waldheim in 1808. It was given the name Elasmotherium – a name which means “plated beast.”

Different Elasmotherium pictures show this mammal in very different ways. Some pictures show it as a hairless rhinoceros, others show it as being covered in a thick coat of fur. While paleontologists aren’t completely sure at the moment, it is believed that this mammal did have a coat of fur to keep it warm.

One of the most interesting facts about Elasmotherium is this animal is one that has quite a few names. While its official and scientific name is Elasmotherium, it has also been known as the giant rhinoceros, the steppe rhinoceros, and the giant Siberian rhinoceros. It was a mammal that was related to the wooly rhinoceros, also known as Coelodonta.

These animals were approximately 20 feet long and weighed around 4 tons. They walked on all four legs and had a big horn on their nose. This horn was made out of keratin – the same thing that human hair is made out of. Paleontologists believe this horn wasn’t used for protection but was used to attract mates. Even so, scientists believe this horn could grow as long as 5 or 6 feet.

Elasmotherium was an herbivore, so it lived off of the plant material of its time. This animal was probably a grassland feeder – much like an elephant. It probably traveled for long distances so it could take advantage of different grasses. It could have possibly traveled in herds for protection against any predators that may have been around at the time.

This rhino went extinct during the last Ice Age – approximately 10,000 years ago. Which means that it was probably well known to the settlers of Eurasia at that time. It was also probably have been the basis for the unicorn myth that has persisted for thousands of years. Stories of mythical one-horned creatures can be found all through Russian literature and then later, in Indian and Persian literature. These stories were then probably imported into Europe, either by oral tradition or by traveling monks, where they were changed into the unicorn stories we know today.

starfinder

Rarity: Rare.
Metahub Tier: TBA.
Health: 4500.
Damage: 1200.
Speed: 108
Defence: 30%
Critical chance: 5%

Defensive Stance.
Definite Rampage.
Rending Strike

So, thoughts on this megafauna? Is it worth including on a team? Tactics and suggestions? What changes would you make and anything else you can think of?

3 Likes
#2

To me, this is what Brontotherum wanted to be as a Common. Elasmotherium is the better option but it’s another animal where there are a lot better animals to choose from.

#3

Wow, it only went extinct 10,000 years ago? That really isn’t that long ago, compared to the 65+ million years for dinosaurs…

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#4

I love these types of animals, some things I like about Cenozoics. I hope the add the giant sloth Megatherium.

1 Like
#5

making its appearance in this game curious, no?

1 Like
#6

Probably a lot easier to find DNA than from dinosaurs.

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#7

Wrong, just wrong

#8

Still not liking the Cenozoics then?

#9

It say I’m not a fan. I’m not trouncing them just not a fan. I used this one in arena and for me at least it was very underwhelming.

I think the best description is obtuse to use.

1 Like
#10

No, is just that cenozoics are harder to find in the wild

1 Like
#11

This this is the bringer of lag to my phone. Wherever this thing is lag follows. Darting it? Laggy. Looking at it? Laggy. God forbid I battle with it.

#12

It’s rending attack is actually fun. You can defensive stance big blows and hit hard with definite Rampage

#13

My wife likes it too. Just for the reasons you mentioned.

#14

I mean… say you’re a team of In-Geneticists who have figured out how to re-create actual dinosaurs; why stop there?

1 Like
#15

In soft canon for the Jurassic franchise the first animal they successfully cloned was a Smilodon.

#16

In fact, realistically speaking the chances of actual extinct creatures to ever be brought back to life should obviously be the more recent extinct. I do hope, however, that we’re not gonna see Dodos, Moas, Quaggas or Thylacines in the game :slight_smile:
Wouldn’t mind seeing Glyptodons, Mammoths, Megatheriums, or any of their hybrids though!

1 Like
#17

I am surprised mammoth wasn’t one of the starting animals but I guess you have to keep some good stuff for later on.

#18

Yeah like they did with Brachio and stuff.

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#19

with all due respect john, if i’m a team of in-geneticists that have mastered cloning, why start there?

2 Likes
#20

The ethical backlash to this would be epic! I feel like this is reflected in the movie canon by the fact that we’re only now seeing a human test subject. Perhaps some scientists are preoccupied over whether or not they should?

1 Like