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Dinosaur of the Day #178 - Woolly Rhinoceros

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Coelodonta is one of the most commonly represented‭ ‘‬ice age‭’ ‬mammals,‭ ‬yet surprisingly it often only gets a name mention.‭ ‬Popularly known as the woolly rhino,‭ ‬Coelodonta resembled the large rhinos that we know today from Africa,‭ ‬but with a complete covering of fur over its body.‭ ‬This was the main survival adaptation of Coelodonta which inhabited most of Eurasia for over two and a half million years.

Coelodonta lived at a time that saw a series of glaciations across the Northern hemisphere that saw sheets of ice sweeping over much of the land,‭ ‬to‭ ‬receding back before covering the land again.‭ ‬This toing and froing of the ice sheets,‭ ‬combined with the colder climate that caused much of the lower soil depths to be permanently frozen,‭ ‬created vast expanses of frozen plains that were covered in grasses interspersed with low growing vegetation,‭ ‬and it‭ ‬is‭ ‬this ecosystem that Coelodonta seems to have been most adapted to.‭ ‬As with many similar herbivores,‭ ‬Coelodonta had sharp incising teeth at the front of the mouth and mashing molar teeth at the back.‭ ‬Between these two sets of teeth was a gap called the diastema,‭ ‬something else that is common amongst herbivorous mammals.

It’s uncertain exactly what kind of herbivore Coelodonta was.‭ ‬Some people think that Coelodonta was a grazer that cropped the grass plains like a cow,‭ ‬while others believe that it was a browser than fed from low growing plants.‭ ‬Either one is plausible‭; ‬although most lean towards the grazing idea as grasses would have been much more abundant than more complex low growing plants.‭ ‬Coelodonta is thought to have used a fermentation method of processing the cellulose rich grasses in order to get the full nutritional benefit from the nutritionally poor vegetation of the ecosystem.‭ ‬This is actually a very clever method of digestion to adopt since as the grass is broken down by fermentation inside the gut of Coelodonta,‭ ‬it generates a small amount of heat that would have the added effect of warming the body from the inside.

This method of digestion seems to have been very efficient for Coelodonta as specimens where the main body is still preserved show that Coelodonta had a hump that rose up from its back above the shoulder blades.‭ ‬This hump was supported from within by the forwards dorsal vertebrae that had elongated neural spines growing from them,‭ ‬much larger the neural spines of the other vertebrae.‭ ‬This hump would have served as fat storage so that Coelodonta could build up fat reserves in the milder spring and summer so that it could better survive the colder winter when the plants had begun to die back,‭ ‬and possibly even had a deep covering of snow and ice.

No description of a rhino would be complete without mentioning the horn and this goes double for Coelodonta as it had two pronounced horns rising from its snout.‭ ‬The front horn at up to two meters long was the longer of the two,‭ ‬with the second horn rising from the middle of the snout being just over half to two thirds as big.‭ ‬The classical explanation for these horns is that they were what‭ ‬are termed sexually selected characteristics.‭ ‬This is based upon the knowledge that the horn would have been growing throughout the animals life,‭ ‬no more than a stump in a juvenile to fully developed in mature individuals.‭ ‬An older animal would have a more developed horn than younger individuals signalling to members of the opposite sex that it had the genetic makeup and success to make it to later life,‭ ‬and was more deserving of passing its genes down to the next generation than lesser individuals that had less developed horns.‭ ‬Such reasoning would explain the progression to larger horn sizes.

However there is a second theory regarding the front horn that is both an alternative and possible addition to the above theory.‭ ‬The front horn is strongly curved so that it extends out beyond the end of the snout.‭ ‬This horn is also laterally compressed so that when viewed from the front the horn looks more like a blade rather than a cone like in other genera.‭ ‬This leads to the popular interpretation the front horn was not just a display device but an actual tool that Coelodonta used to scrape snow off the ground as it moved its head from side to side.‭ ‬This would expose buried grasses that allowed Coelodonta to feed further without using energy to walk to an area that was uncovered,‭ ‬and would have been of particular use when Coelodonta was in areas that had frequent snowfall,‭ ‬but not a permanent covering.

The earliest remains of Coelodonta are from India and have been dated back to the end of the Pliocene period.‭ ‬The majority of other Coelodonta remains so far known are from Europe and Russia and these date back to the Calabrian of the Pleistocene,‭ ‬which suggests that Coelodonta first emerged in central Asia and then expanded its range.‭ ‬This expansion could have been synchronised to the availability of tundra-like environments that were constantly changed from the varying expansion and receding of the ice sheets that once covered the northern hemisphere.

One of the best examples of‭ ‬Coelodonta comes from a Tar Pit in Poland‭ (‬near Starunia‭) ‬that had its body frozen and preserved.‭ ‬Before this time the only visual representation of the living Coelodonta was in the form of cave art that had been made by ancient human beings.

nosorozec
The preserved Starunia Rhino.

megaloceros-giganteus-irish-elk-size

Rarity: Epic.
Metahub Tier: TBA.
Health: 4500.
Damage: 1070.
Speed: 108.
Defence: 15%
Critical chance: 5%

Decelerating Strike.
Lethal Wound.
Definite Rampage.
Immune to Damage Over Time.

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I have no thoughts on this yet since I don’t have it. But it’s stats and moves look decent enough. I like how it has Lethal Wound, probably because of its horn.

That is my problem. On paper she looks nice but I’m not sure as I’m not in a position to field her yet or face in the Arena and so I’m not sure how she plays out.

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I’ve fought it in the arena it was okay
Loses badly to the mammoth and turtle tho

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Love th model tho

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I don’t, too fluffy

Lol she is wolly for a reason :joy:

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Working towards it. Looks like a beast

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I have just unlocked it thanks to sanctuaries. Decided to try it out in the campaign and got this hilarious screenshot.

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I have it unlocked. It’s pretty good for an epic, but not as good as the top tier nonhybrid epics like mammoth and turtle. Still fun to play with and looks cool. Although I think the feet are too stumpy.

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It has been nearly a year since the Dinosaur of the Day discussions started and I thought it might be nice to slowly revisit them and see how things have changed

Rarity: Epic.
Metahub Tier: Alpha Low.
Health: 4410.
Damage: 1000.
Speed: 108.
Defence: 15%
Critical chance: 5%

DNA can be used to create Keratoporcus and Monolorhino.

Decelerating Strike.
Lethal Wound.
Definite Rampage.
Immune to Damage Over Time.

Since her first appearance last winter, Woolly Rhinoceros has lost a tiny bit of health but otherwise remains the same. I’m not sure what to make of her anymore. I used to like her when she first appeared but the more I have used her in the Arena, strike towers and tournament battles, the less viable I find her. I’m fairly sure that I’m in the minority there though. I find her slow, not putting out enough damage and dies far too easily. I’ve swapped her out of teams before because of that. I really want to like her but…

She was probably okay at the time but now I think she’ll end up a DNA farm for her two hybrids, both of which are arguably better though similar options.

What are your thoughts on this cenozoic beast in the current game?

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Pretty decent. Beats stuff like Diplodocus and T rex, and can do not insignificant damage to a turtle.
Definite Rampage isn’t really needed among the Epics though, since we don’t have an Epic non-hybrid Dodger, but if/when we do get one, it’ll probably find some use there too.

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I feel the same way, Colin. I used to find her great, especially in tournaments. But recently, her use has been dwindling.

I don’t think it helps that Ludia seem determined to get rid of all bleeders with the ridiculous amount of creatures that are immune to it.

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