Speed of Dinosaurs - Attack Based Speed, Not Dino Based


#1

Good Morning Ludia and Friends,

I have some questions on on what exactly was used to determine speed of a dinosaur and it’s archetypes. I notice a very large varience in speed of a dinosaur in battle versus a dinosaur in the field (during DNA Collection) and I am not entirely sure why.

For example - Two dinosaurs of the same rarity

A muscle heavy theropod like the Tyrannosaurus Rex has a speed of 102. In the Arena, 102 is almost (if not the most) the slowest speed in the game, rendering the Rex very useless. However, when a Tyrannosaurus is met in the field for collection, it is one of the FASTEST creatures to run and has the highest “escape” rate of anything I come across.

Now, on the flip side, a armor plated 4-legged dinosaur like the Ankylosaurus has a speed of 116. In the Arena, that is about average. Again, however, when an Ankylosaurus is come across in the world for DNA collection, it is one of the SLOWEST creatures to run and almost never escapes.

So what I am getting at is this; why are creatures in the field the complete opposite in the Arena when it comes to speed. Also, why is a heavy plated, 4 legged waddle-bound Akylosaurus faster than a muscle mass theropod like the Rex-class dinosaurs?

In my honest opinion and to keep the arena and the field unified, the speed of dinosaurs need to match. If the Rex archtypes are going to remain slow, then make them slow in the field. Same concept of the armor-plate class.

My speed balance changes would be as follows (only 4 affected families):

  • Ankylosauride Speed Range: 102 to 108
  • Brachiosauridae Speed Range: 107 to 114
  • Stegosauridae Speed Range: 112 to 118
  • Tyrannosauridae Speed Range: 112 to 118

I want to hear back from the community and the developers.

UPDATE: After Discussing with Rae -

How about if a Dinosaur’s attack speed came from the type of attack itself? For example, an attack that would Stun is slower than an attack that is just a basic strike?

By this logic, if the attack is a basic attack, it might be faster than an attack that makes a dinosaur move around, such as the Ankylo having to turn around and bash its tail vs a basic club swing.

It might limit the need for a faster dinosaur as a whole and will introduce strategies beyond just a simple “I get to attack you first everytime”.

-Darth


#2

The first thing that came to mind was that speed might be more based on how quick the dino can dish out the attack, not nessesarily its actual running speed. The T-Rex in life was a long distance sprinter, so the DNA collection is kind of relistic in that sense of speed. I cant imagine smaller more armored dinos being sprinters :joy: even though watching them waddle is hilarious.


#3

Here’s a thought. This would combine your thoughts with that of mine.

How about if a Dinosaur’s attack speed came from the type of attack itself? For example, an attack that would Stun is slower than an attack that is just a basic strike?

By this logic, if the attack is a basic attack, it might be faster than an attack that makes a dinosaur move around, such as the Ankylo having to turn around and bash its tail vs a basic club swing.

It might limit the need for a faster dinosaur as a whole and will introduce strategies beyond just a simple “I get to attack you first everytime”.


#4

That would actually balance out the battle system if I’m not mistaken, having speed stats to attack rather than the actual dinosaur. Though raptors would still dominate even though theyve nerfed them.


#5

I don’t think so. The speed down would be more needed to keep a raptor in check. I mean even the lowest speed reduction (33%) is still a lot! That’s -33 speed or more for all dinos. If speeds were variable, I would consider using a stun or a speed down much more than I would now. Then the raptor can decide; “should I chance using my high damage, lower attack speed attack” in the off chance I avoid being killed or use my standard high speed strike for a hit before I die.


#6

While I am totally with all the points you made on the specific speed idea, I can foresee this is going to lead to an enormous impact on battle mechanic waaay much. That said, it will possibly be a massive update like the latest one.
Seemingly the majority are still getting along with speed mechanic at the time. Ludia doesn’t have a reasoning to prioritize an issue over all the others if the suggesting crowd hasn’t grown to scale, let alone the massive change could turn out to be negating tons of previous achievements of those active players’.


#7

While you’ve brought up a few interesting ideas, I don’t think that these suggestions should be implemented as future updates. While it would increase the amount of strategy required, I think you underestimate how much more complicated it would be to create even a modest amount of balanced gameplay by reducing the importance of the creatures’ base speeds. (I use the term “balanced gameplay” lightly here, because it means something different to everyone.)

Would it introduce more strategy into the game to convert the system over? Sure it would.

Would it limit the need for a faster dinosaur? Not exactly…The first to strike generally has the advantage–and if there was an available move that was faster than all the others and packed the biggest hit, that’s the creature(s) everyone would be using. While many players currently encounter the same 2-3 creatures on their opponents’ teams, I think the diversity would be a whole lot less evidence were another system implemented…but that’s just my take on it.


#8

When I think of speed in battle I think more of reaction time then of how fast it can run. The ankylosaurus may not be able to get its little stubs moving fast enough to outpace a trex but it may be able to swing that tail around faster than the big guy could reach down and chomp.


#9

Haha, I agree with that logic Paralea, but do me a favor.

I want you to bend down and bite, and stand back up. Count how long it takes you to complete that action.

Now I want you you turn around, lift your leg up, slam your leg down, then turn back around. I want you to count how long it takes you to complete that action.

No, I don’t actually expect you to do it, haha. But logically, it’s going to take me a lot longer to do action 2 than action 1. So how can an attack with so much more body movement requirements be faster than a simple chomp?


#10

The bending down and chomping would take more time for me than the leg slam roundhouse kick, but that’s probally only because my back is killing me so getting back up after bending down is slow going. Lol.


#11

Haha! Fair point, but you can see where I was theoretically going with it. :slight_smile: